Reality Revised Run 2015

I had a great time performing on the “Reality Revised Run”. It was a small tour consisting of three shows promoting my recently released mixtape, “Reality Revised Vol. 1”. The goal of the tour was to incorporate comedy with music, due to the fact that the mixtape is humorous. To achieve this goal, I brought comedian, Ronnie Reed, to open each show for me.

Ronnie and I grew up together in the northwest corner of Connecticut. He has achieved credible roles as an actor, and is as ambitious as I am career-wise. I have seen him perform in the past, but it was great to see him present material relevant to what I was performing.

The first show was in New York, NY at Billie’s Black. I visited the venue a week before the event. It was calm and I really liked the vibe and environment. On the night of the performance I wasn’t prepared for the setting that was given. I imagined that everybody would be on their feet in dancing mode by the time I stood on stage. Considering a comedian performed right before me, it’s not that surprising that they weren’t ready to dance. On the bright side, the turn out was decent and had a great review on music and performance quality. I had a great time talking with the owner and other staff members as well, they were very welcoming and respectful.

Our second show was in Newport, RI at Jimmy’s Saloon. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to check out the venue ahead of time (definitely should have), so I wasn’t able to set expectations before we got there. This made me nervous, only because we weren’t informed of everything that was going on at the venue. This show did not have as decent of a turnout as Billie’s Black the week before, but the feedback was positive. I had a girl approach me afterwards and ask if I had a mailing list, which I was very surprised to hear, because no one has asked before.

The final show of the tour was back in New York, NY at Otto’s Shrunken Head. Even though the venue seemed very spooky when I checked it out, the performance was our best yet. Many of our loyal fans from the Tri-state area came to support, and a handful of new faces attended, as well. This tour taught me many things that I will apply to future shows. One thing I will do is always check out the venue ahead of time. While checking a venue out, I will be aware of all surroundings so I can use that for marketing advantages. For example, if there is a college nearby, I will look at the college as a marketing outlet to promote the show. Another thing I learned was to always book shows months in advance; some say two to three months is ideal for booking shows. I will be booking three to four months ahead for future shows. This will give enough time for promotions and PR’s to get done ahead of time in an organized manner.

Successfully Selling Music

With digital distribution becoming easier and easier as time goes on, you see and hear about more people selling music digitally. A common result is that most of these people aren’t selling many copies, or songs at all. Although there could be many reasons for this, I am going to elaborate on one common reason, which is the people who aren’t selling, aren’t working!

In order to sell anything, you need a product. In this case the product would be the song, album, etc. The first most important thing is to make sure the product is a “quality product”, so instead of recording a song in your closet, and not mixing or mastering it, then sending to a digital distribution company, why not invest what it’s worth to have your project mixed and/or mastered professional so it has the quality that your potential customer(s) deserve(s)?

Let’s just assume the project you have ready for digital distribution has had a professional mix and master applied to it. What’s next?

Creating a marketing plan is key to selling anything! A basic marketing plan is better than nothing, just ask yourself Who? What? How? When? Why? The “Who” is who you are targeting to market this product to. If it’s an edm/dance track, most likely your target audience will be 14-30 year old females & males (very brief, should be more specific), (to be even more specific, target high schools and colleges). The “What” is what the product is, (Your project). The “How” is how will you market it, (the plan), and if the plan requires any funding, how will you provide funding? The “When” is when will you start, and when will you stop. Finally, the “Why”, this applies to the “How” portion, only because it explains “why people should buy this product”. Even though there are many courses offered to create a more advanced marketing plan, this basic one will definitely help enhance your marketing skills, and experience. Many will always plan the marketing for their product before the product is created, Never do this! Always remember, in order to market a product, you need a product to market. Even if you think you have a solid idea of what the product will be, it can always change through the creation process so never settle on assumption, settle on result.

Even though the marketing plan is crucial to selling your music, consistency is just as important. Many people think that once they send their project in for digital distribution the work is over, Oh no! That’s just the first step! Using a marketing plan will tell you this. After you send the project in to be distributed digitally, you need to “work” this track, this means you have to go town to town posting ads for the song, book events or shows to promote the song, do anything possible to develop a buzz to allow “word of mouth” to take over, but at the same time, be the artist!
I wish the most success to any musician, of any genre, and I hope you take something beneficial from this post.

 

 

 

Ratchet Ri¢h

For as long as I can remember I have always scuffed my shoes up, stained or ripped clothes on accident, or even damaged an object I own such as my car. Although it gets aggravating depending on the severity of the damage, I take pride in whatever I do to make it better. I may use white out for a stain on a white T-Shirt, or a marker or crayon to color over a stain on a new pair of shoes, I may have even painted a strip of tape to match my car to cover a scratch on the passenger door. Whatever it is that I do to fix the flaw or imperfection on the item(s) that people may see me with I spend little to nothing. Many people would say “It’s replaceable, buy another pair” or “That’s nothing, nobody will see it”. In the long run I could spend roughly $500+ to replace a casual outfit. What’s the point? Why buy a new outfit? I mean, why did I buy that outfit in the first place? The most obvious reason would be that I was satisfied with how I looked wearing it. If I bought an object, the reason for buying it could’ve been that I thought it fit my personality. That’s when I put two together and wrote “Ratchet Ri¢h”. It’s not only about fixing damaged clothes, etc. using the slightest effort, and spending little to nothing. It’s a style, it’s one’s way to connect with the world using creativity, art, taste, and most importantly their individual image. When anybody notices somebody else wearing an outfit that interests them, they’re most likely wanting to approach that person to compliment them, or if somebody hates the sunglasses they see somebody else wearing, they may even want to express their opinion on what they don’t particularly like about the sunglasses. Either way, the person wearing the outfit, and the person wearing the sunglasses now have the opportunity to share their interests and vision, all because he or she wore what they believed represented them the best. Be Ratchet Ri¢h! Spend little to nothing to make what you have better. Everybody has a vision, why not express it everyday?
QR RR

Back In The Studio Pt. 1

After a successful turnout from my last single (True Colors), I went back into the studio recently to work on the next project. The studio was MindMicProductions located in downtown Manhattan. Even though trying new studios is often risky, and could potentially be a complete waste of money, I had an amazing experience there. The studio itself consists of two rooms, the control room, and the live room, both accumulating to a comfortable size. The overall vibe was relaxing, fun, and exciting. The thing that surprised me the most was how non-commercialized this studio is, considering it is located in one of the busiest areas of the city. I admired that it had a private feel to it, which is a rare quality being that most studios that are still standing today go for a more public approach.

The most important thing I look for as an artist is quality in studios. This goes for equipment, engineer experience, and the overall potential. After producing, working, and recording for the past several years (mainly in the city) I’ve spoken with many artists, some who feel the same way. Many take a more illogical approach to a project by choosing a studio based on who has recorded there in the past, or they base it on a certain big time event that has happened at that studio. Obviously if their point is that it must be a good quality studio based on whoever recorded there, then it’s not that bad, but many choose a studio just to say they’ve recorded at the same studio as whoever else recorded there (a big name artist). I’ve witnessed this many times, and it is very irritating. If you really love your music, if you really care about what you sound like, if you really believe you have an amazing product to deliver upon recording, Choose a studio that will give the best quality for that genre. There are studios available all over for each and every genre, it’s just up to you to find the right one for you.

For more information on MindMic Productions visit: http://www.mindmicproductions.com/
Or call Rize Up Entertainment at (845) 518-RIZE